Entering the era of smart study groups

by Brandon Klien, Collaboration.Ai

I have been interested in education since I taught my first Sunday School class when I was in 6th grade. Teaching from the book (as I was told) versus helping kids understand and enjoy — always seemed at odds with what I saw and experienced.

Well outside of my schooling years now, having had the opportunity to train many hundreds on how to facilitate collaboration better — I realize that I have once again become a student. Daily the evidence builds that our education system, now more than ever, is in need of change. And with three young children for whom I’ve had to begin making decisions regarding their educational journeys, I have spent some time revisiting my learning experiences. Continue reading

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What is phishing and spear phishing?

One of the most basic practices every cybersecurity guide will recommend is not to click on links and attachments contained in emails coming from unknown sources, and to think twice even if they come from seemingly trustworthy sources.

You think it’s unnecessary caution? Ask John Podesta, chairman of Hillary Clinton’s presidential elections campaign. This is exactly how he (or the operator of his email account) gave away his accounts credentials to hackers. The breach led to a series of damaging and embarrassing leaks which might have cost his boss her chance of becoming president. Continue reading

What’s preventing Artificial Intelligence from taking the next big leap?

No one will argue that Artificial Intelligence has taken great strides in past years. Thanks to AI we’re getting targeted and personalized ads, becoming better in education, healthcare, agriculture and whatnot.

So what’s preventing Artificial Intelligence from taking the next big leap? Maybe it’s intelligence.

Fact of the matter is, AI algorithms are becoming very smart and efficient at doing specific tasks, but they’re not smart enough to explain their decisions. And neither can their creators. Continue reading

How to boost the range and security of your home WiFi network

By Muhammad Asfand Yar, List Enthusiast

Everybody seems to love WiFi. So do I. After all, who doesn’t want to have seamless internet access, across different devices, while roaming around their house. But this apparent ease of installation and usefulness can make your WiFi network slow sometimes and vulnerable to attacks. To help you out, here is an infographic by List Enthusiast which discusses how we can improve the overall state of our home WiFi networks.

Here are some of the main takeaways from that infographic about how to boost signal range and WiFi security. Continue reading

How healthcare can benefit from Artificial Intelligence

As artificial intelligence takes leaps at an increasing pace, there’s fear that robots will conquer the future and put humans out of jobs. While technological unemployment is a worry that has its own merits, there are some fields where there is already a shortage of human experts.

One of those fields is healthcare. It takes years of education and hands-on experience to train a decent doctor. And as the figures show, there’s a shortage of physicians everywhere.

Fortunately, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning can help alleviate this problem. AI-powered tools can help healthcare workers and doctors improve precision and efficiency while lowering skill and energy requirements. This can effectively put more people into healthcare jobs while also bringing services to a larger number of people, especially in underserved areas. Continue reading

Why should you care about the Net Neutrality and Open Internet debate?

By Orla Forrest, Irish Telecom

Net neutrality refers to the provision of a completely open Internet whereby any user can access and post online content that they please, in the knowledge that it will not be censored by Internet service providers (ISPs). For most web users, it is the preferred state of affairs, as their views will not be censored, while mega-rich corporations are prevented from pricing users out of an online presence. However, ISPs and a minority of users will tell you that online content should be prioritized in order of importance and that heavy users should be charged more so that bandwidth can be distributed more appropriately. Continue reading

The tyranny of the social media filter bubble

In this picture taken on Tuesday April 4, 2017, Syrian man Abdul-Hamid Alyousef, 29, carries his twin babies who were killed during the suspected chemical weapons attack, in Khan Sheikhoun town, in the northern province of Idlib, Syria. (AP Photo/Alaa Alyousef)

Two days ago one of the worst crimes against humanity in recent years took place in Syria. The government of Bashar al-Assad carried out an aerial bombing on the town of Khan Sheikhun, targeting defenseless residents of the town with the sarin nerve agent. At least 70 people were killed—tormented to death—among them children.

Meanwhile, social media platforms didn’t think this would be something I should know about. Facebook insisted I should rather be following funny animal videos and other silly posts on pages I’ve liked (TBH, I don’t use the platform very much, and I’m happy about it). Twitter, on the other hand, fed me with a rich list of the latest tech news and innovations and some promotional tweets that I ignored as usual. Continue reading