If you hate email trackers, block them now

I think it’s totally up to me whether I decide to open an email or not. But apparently, others are not of the same opinion. That’s why they use mail tracking applications, a breed of software that will let the sender of an email know when you read their message.

I find it invasive, even more offending than link trackers (most mail trackers track links as well). And as it happens, most—but not all—of the tracked emails I receive are of little value. That’s why I block mail trackers and let their users think their emails were never opened.

So if you find email tracking creepy, here’s what you need to know about how it works and how you can stop it. Continue reading

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How to extend Wi-Fi range and speed

By ConnectionCafe

Browsing at the speed of a snail, unable to properly stream media, constant drops in Wi-Fi signals, and numerous dead zones can create ever frustrating situations. We live in a world where the internet has become an integral part of our lives and a slow one just won’t do.

A common problem would be the distance, if the network needs to cover a huge area with thick walls and numerous corners, then connection quality will drop. Here are a few measures that can improve your Wi-Fi experience. Continue reading

Most effective ways to make your blog popular

By Vincent Hill

Owning a popular blog is every blogger’s dream, but like everything else, you’re going to have to sweat it to get what you want. If you’re new in the game, making your blog popular is not easy and doesn’t happen overnight. However, if you are willing and determined to work hard to learn and adapt, then success may just be right around the corner for you. Continue reading

How to protect your data against ISP snooping

As internet privacy continues to unravel, it is becoming more and more evident that you’re on your own to protect your data against the many parties that are looking to hoard it. Perhaps one of the most pervasive collectors of data are Internet Service Providers (ISPs), the same companies that connect you to the internet.

ISPs have a huge stake in collecting data, mostly in selling it to advertisers to serve more targeted ads. And they’re in the best position to do so with wild abandon, without fear of retribution.

But a lot more than your preferences can be inferred from your internet traffic, including your health conditions and political orientation among others. Continue reading

How to boost the range and security of your home WiFi network

By Muhammad Asfand Yar, List Enthusiast

Everybody seems to love WiFi. So do I. After all, who doesn’t want to have seamless internet access, across different devices, while roaming around their house. But this apparent ease of installation and usefulness can make your WiFi network slow sometimes and vulnerable to attacks. To help you out, here is an infographic by List Enthusiast which discusses how we can improve the overall state of our home WiFi networks.

Here are some of the main takeaways from that infographic about how to boost signal range and WiFi security. Continue reading

Evolving your security operations strategy to fit the cloud

By Oliver Pinson-Roxburgh, Alert Logic

The decision to move to the cloud may seem an obvious one. It’s faster, more scalable, and more agile. However, security remains a concern, and rightly so. The foundational infrastructure delivered by cloud providers is secure, but guaranteeing the protection of the applications, workloads, and data you run on top of it is your responsibility—and it isn’t one to be taken lightly.

A traditional on-premises security operations strategy simply won’t cut it anymore. In its place, you need a cloud-specific security strategy to protect your critical data from an ever-growing variety of advanced threats. Outlined in this article are four elements for any security official to consider when making the jump to a cloud system. Continue reading

Why are public WiFi networks insecure?

Public WiFi network

If you follow tech and cybersecurity news, this is something that you see a lot: Public WiFi networks, the free wireless networks found at hotels, airports and cafes, are unsafe and can cut you some major cyberslack.

As is the case with most threats, when something is publicized a lot, people tend to become less sensible and ignore it. It becomes common belief that the danger will mostly apply to other people and not me. (This is one of the weirdest aspects of human nature, finding one’s security in the insecurity of others.) Continue reading