The tyranny of the social media filter bubble

In this picture taken on Tuesday April 4, 2017, Syrian man Abdul-Hamid Alyousef, 29, carries his twin babies who were killed during the suspected chemical weapons attack, in Khan Sheikhoun town, in the northern province of Idlib, Syria. (AP Photo/Alaa Alyousef)

Two days ago one of the worst crimes against humanity in recent years took place in Syria. The government of Bashar al-Assad carried out an aerial bombing on the town of Khan Sheikhun, targeting defenseless residents of the town with the sarin nerve agent. At least 70 people were killed—tormented to death—among them children.

Meanwhile, social media platforms didn’t think this would be something I should know about. Facebook insisted I should rather be following funny animal videos and other silly posts on pages I’ve liked (TBH, I don’t use the platform very much, and I’m happy about it). Twitter, on the other hand, fed me with a rich list of the latest tech news and innovations and some promotional tweets that I ignored as usual. Continue reading

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