Dealing with social engineering at times of uncertainty

Protest

Human failure is the single biggest contributing factor to security incidents, hacks and data breaches. Social engineers, cybercriminals that invest in human errors rather than technical vulnerabilities, are always on the lookout for exclusive opportunities to incite strong feelings in their targets and prod them to make a fatal mistake.

The anxiety and uncertainty surrounding the immigration ban in the U.S. provides the perfect climate for social engineering attacks, a fact that is largely ignored while the political aspects of the ban are being highlighted and fanned with ample frequency by the media. Continue reading

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The cybersecurity talent shortage crisis

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Cyber-threats and data breaches are growing in number and severity, botnets are enlisting new conscripts at a chaotic pace, cryptoransomware attacks are raking in millions for malicious hackers… and we are hard-pressed and ill-prepared to face the challenges that lie ahead. The widening gap of cybersecurity talent is at the heart of this crisis. There’s currently a 1 million shortage of skilled workers in the cybersecurity sector. According to (ISC)2, that number will rise to 1.5 million by 2020 – Cisco’s Annual Security Report says we’ll reach the 1.5 million threshold by 2019. A study led by ISACA shows that most organizations are having trouble find cybersecurity talent to fill their IT security vacancies. Continue reading